Interdisciplinary (INT)

Note: Some courses listed here may run only once per academic year, or every other academic year. Not all courses are available on both campuses. The catalog is constantly changing. Visit the pace website to view the most current class schedule, class descriptions, and required or suggested prerequisites.

 

INT 193 Science and Technology in Contemporary Society (3 credits)
Scientific literacy may be defined broadly as understanding connections among concepts in the natural and social sciences, mathematics and technology. By breaking down traditional disciplinary barriers, this course will help students grasp connections between these disciplines, bridge the traditional barriers between disciplines, and understand that modern scientific inquiry and solutions more often than not involves a “systems” approach that spans various fields. This course consists of weekly in-class meeting, an on-line component, and required attendance at a pre-determined number of lectures held at the NY Academy of Sciences. Each student will be assigned a lecture in four different areas of science and technology. The first half of the course will involve a fixed curriculum covering specific topics. The second half of the course will involve presentations by students based upon their attendance at the NYAS lectures.

INT 195B The Hudson River and the American Tide (6 credits)
This course will explore the historical, political, economic, and literary role of the Hudson River in the development of New York and the nation. We will cover how the River dominated the psyche of the region, as an economic corridor, as the birthplace of major movements in literature and graphic art, and as a subject of ecological debate. We will also inquire into the various values that emerged defining the relationship between nature and culture along the Hudson. Field trips will cover the historical locations, economic zones, art collections, and travel on the river itself.

INT196W Social Constructions of Nature: A Critical and Philosophical Examination of the Natural World (6 credits – Learning Community Course)
Throughout history, people have asked: What is the ideal society? What is its relationship to human nature and needs? Does one need a change in society or a change in mankind? We will look at "utopian" literary explorations of these themes as well as real attempts to create the "Good Society." We will visit Shaker Village Museum to understand this nineteenth century religious community, as well as the Bruderhof to explore and participate in this contemporary effort to build a better society.

INT 197F Writing Nature: Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Environment (6 credits – Learning Community Course)
This course explores several facets of our relationship to our environment. From the nineteenth century to the present, we will focus on literary, philosophical, and artistic appreciation of nature in relation to the individual and society through such American writers and artists as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thomas Cole, Emily Dickinson, and Rachel Carson. Through field studies and visits to museums and historical sites, we will investigate the role of place and nature in art and local and urban environments. We will also turn our attention to rhetorical and philosophical dimensions of current controversies, such as resource contamination and protection, environmental justice, population, energy, and biotechnology.

INT 197J Writing Nature: The Rhetoric of Environmental Discourse (7 credits)
This course explores rhetorical strategies of artists, scientists, and naturalists working in different genres and media reflecting on nature. We will begin with an introduction to the rhetorical tradition, from key classical philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle to contemporary theorists like Kenneth Burke. We will focus on literary, philosophical, and artistic appreciation of nature in relation to the individual and society. Through field studies and visits to museums and natural areas, we will investigate the role of place and nature in art and local and urban environments. We will also turn our attention to rhetorical and philosophical dimensions of current controversies, such as globalization, resource contamination and protection, environmental justice, population, energy, and biotechnology.

INT 197XA Exploring Our Environment (6 credits - Learning Community Course)
Everything we do connects somehow with the natural world. In this learning community, students will discover ways we as individuals can have a positive impact on the environment. They will also explore ways environmental conditions affect our health, recreation/leisure activities, and economic situations. This class combines hands-on learning with discussions, guest speakers, and group projects. Students will make presentations on such topics as overpopulation, biodiversity, wildlife, pollution and sustainable farming. Planned field trips include a wildlife sanctuary, an organic farm, a state park, and wetlands.

INT 198A Introduction to Environmental Studies: Philosophical, Political and Social Perspectives I (3 credits)
No description available.

INT 198B Introduction to Environmental Studies: Philosophical, Political and Social Perspectives II (3 credits)
No description available.

INT 198G Topic: Nature Exposed: Exploring Nature through the Lens (6 credits – Learning Community Couse)
This course challenges students to investigate nature beyond the surface in order to understand how natural systems work in harmony. Students record their interpretations through the lens of a camera, creating a convergence of nature and photographic technology. Field study combined with essays and other readings expose students to the beautiful simplicities as well as the intricacies of the plant and animal world. Correlations are made between human impact and current environmental issues. Students must have a digital camera.

INT 199A Introduction to Environmental Science: Biological Perspective (3 credits)
No description available.

INT 199B Introduction to Environmental Science: Chemical Perspectives (3 credits)
No description available.

INT 200C Perspectives on Community: Active Service and Research (3 credits)
No description available.

INT 201D Environmental Problems and Human Responses (6 credits)
No description available.

INT 201P Topic: Environmental Politics and the Economy (4 credits)
No description available.

INT 202A Literature, Philosophy and The American Environment (3 credits)
No description available.

INT 296D Exploring Costa Rica: Environment, Culture and Creative Expressions (6 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to cultural, environmental, literary and historical issues in Costa Rica that will culminate in a field trip to explore different areas of the country, including the cloud forest, rain forest, volcano, and some coastal beaches. This Learning Community integrates social issues, literary perspectives, and culture, inviting students to explore ideas about this unique country through writing, travel, and focused research.

INT 296HR Keys to Global Peace: Non Violent Conflict Resolution and Sustainable Development Learning Community (6 credits - Learning Community Course)
This course will cover various approaches to building peace and sustainable development around the globe. It will combine lectures by Pace professors, from a variety of different disciplines, and other guest speakers, with class discussion and student service projects. Lecture topics include: building community: the interdependence of peace and sustainable development; nonviolent communication as a peace-building tool around the globe; Peace processes in the middle east; sustainable development in developing countries; The business community and global conflict resolution; The role of the united nations in developing world peace; tools for inner peace: Meditation, contemplation, and journaling; effects of war on children; and collaboration as a method for developing public policy.

INT 296I Philosophical & Literary Perspectives on Nature (3 credits)
No description available.

INT 298G Sacred Knowledge: Finding Common Ground Between Native American Traditions and Western Science (6 credits – Learning Community Course)
This course will examine how Native American Traditions inform and ground our sense of nature, democracy, psychology, spirituality and sustainability. In the process we will raise important questions about Euro-American relationships to the natural world. Our goal is to provide students with an understanding of the relevance of Traditional Indigenous Knowledge for the 21st Century. Stories have power in our lives. We should be mindful of this throughout the semester as we read a variety of contemporary Native authors who tell their stories in novels, short stories, poetry and nonfiction. Through a series of writing assignments and oral presentation, students will learn how to summarize, analyze, question their assumptions and find their own voices.

INT 298U Neglected Landscapes: The Environment through Film and Creative Writing (6 credits)
This team-taught course combines the experience and analysis of film with the practice of responding to film through creative writing. The thematic focus of viewing and writing will be “neglected landscapes,” those environments that have been ignored, overlooked, forcefully abused. Examples of areas that may be explored through their depiction in film include New Orleans, the American West, the Great Plains, and the Deep South.

INT 299D Principles of Leadership: Mobilizing Bold Environmental Action (6 credits)
This course will introduce students to leadership theories and principles, focusing primarily on the Social Change Model. Skills such as strategic planning, visioning, conflict resolution and communication will be reviewed in the context of sustainability and applied to environmental case studies relevant to Pace. Opportunities will be provided for students to meet with local environmental leaders from the government, corporation and non-profits, and students will also be introduced to leadership resources offered by Pace Law School. This course will culminate with action-based team projects in which students apply their newfound skills to mobilizing sustainability efforts on the Pleasantville campus. Projects will relate directly to the Master Plan, providing the University with recommendations for specific action steps to foster and promote sustainability initiatives for the redesigned Pleasantville campus.

INT 396A Ethical and Economic Challenges of Eco-Tourism (3 credits)
No description available.

 

Note: Some courses listed here may run only once per academic year, or every other academic year. Not all courses are available on both campuses. The catalog is constantly changing. Visit the pace website to view the most current class schedule, class descriptions, and required or suggested prerequisites.