main navigation
my pace

Faculty & Staff

back to Faculty & Staff

From the President's Desk

News Story

President Krislov reflects on the many accomplishments of the Pace Community, and looks ahead to 2018–2019.

My days as a first-year are coming to an end.

It’s been a wonderful experience coming to Pace, learning so much about this important institution, and meeting so many of you. I wanted to take a moment to thank you for welcoming me and take a look back at this first year, from inauguration to commencement.

It’s been a great year. Enrollment numbers are rising, boosted by the successful transformation of our Pleasantville Campus. Work continues on our New York City Master Plan, with Phase I still scheduled for completion next fall.

We’ve found a wonderful new provost, Vanya Quiñones, who will be arriving at Pace this summer, and an exciting new Development and Alumni Relations Vice President, Gary Laermer, a Pace alumnus who’s returning to campus starting this week.

Nira Herrmann served us ably as interim provost this year, and we’ll be lucky to have her back at the helm of Dyson. David Yassky announced he’s stepping down as dean of the Law School—he’ll return teaching as a faculty member after a sabbatical—and Associate Dean Horace Anderson will step up to interim dean for next year. We’re lucky to have so many talented leaders at Pace.

I even launched a podcast series, called the PaceCast, in which I’ll highlight the great things going on around our campus. The first episode was a conversation with Professor Maria Luskay and her Pace Docs students, about their Puerto Rico documentary, Hope in the Dark.

Throughout this year, Pace people were awarded for their work.

Things got off to a big start in the fall semester, when Pace faculty Matthew Bolton and Emily Welty, together with their students, saw their work with the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons award the Nobel Peace Prize.

In just the last few weeks, Kelsey Parker, a Dyson Honors senior majoring in Environmental Science, won a Fulbright to study soil ecology in Zambia. She achieved that with the guidance and wisdom of John Meletiadis, Assistant Dean for Lubin’s Center for Global Business Programs, Political Science Professor Matthew Bolton, and Colleen O’ Hara, senior associate director of Education Abroad.

Jonathan Looi, a Seidenberg Honors sophomore majoring in Computer Science, won a Boren Scholarship from the National Security Education Program, to study in geopolitics and international relations in Jordan. Jonathan was supported in his application by Theresa Frey, who so ably led Pace International until her departure.

And Jessica Duque, a Dyson sophomore, won a Jeanette Watson Fellowship, for a three-year cultural and professional immersion here in New York City, including a funded internship. History Professor Bill Offutt helped her achieve that prestigious honor.

On top of that, the economics students on our Fed Challenge team won their third title in four years, this time defeating teams from schools including Harvard and Princeton. And Professor Lauren Birney, in the School of Education, won an additional $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation for the Billion Oyster Project, on top of a $5 million grant in 2014.

We’re also continuing to innovate in our academic program. The College of Health Professions just announced an exciting new MS in Nutrition and Dietetics. Lubin is developing new MS programs in the areas of Accounting Analytics and Technologies, Financial Technologies, and Arts and Entertainment Management to meet the demands of the marketplace.  

 

These accolades and announcements are what gets the attention. But what happens day to day here is what matters most. I’ve been deeply impressed by the commitment of so many to the transformational education we give our students. It’s an honor to do what we do, and you should all be proud of doing this life-changing work.

In just a few weeks, another group of graduates will walk into Commencement ceremonies and across the podium to receive diplomas. That moment is powerful—but it doesn’t capture the blood, sweat, toil, and tears these students have put into their work, and that you’ve put into getting them there.

There are so many wonderful success stories here at Pace, and it’s been thrilling for me to learn about them. I’m excited for all our successes next year, and beyond.

And so thank you—for your dedication to our students, for all that you achieve, and for getting me to sophomore status. Have a great summer. I can’t wait for next year. Let’s go!