ED COURSES (ED 670 - ED 789)

   

ED 670 TRENDS AND ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (3 credits)
This course investigates current findings regarding the symptomatology and etiology of developmental and acquired disabilities, disorders and language-based learning problems. Legal and educational issues surrounding disabilities and disorders are examined as well as responsibilities of professionals involved in the evaluation and educational process. The course takes a prenatal-to-adulthood perspective and emphasizes the role of the Early Childhood, Childhood, Middle Childhood, Adolescent teacher in the identification, assessment, planning, instruction, support, transition services and technology appropriate to the needs of the student and the level of instruction. Professional seminars, field experience/apprenticeship accompany this course.
 
ED 671 DIAGNOSIS, ASSESSMENT & EDUCATIONAL PLANNING FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (3 credits)
This course is an applied course in standardized and curriculum-based assessment, functional behavioral assessment, as well as multidisciplinary diagnosis, evaluation and instructional planning for students who are suspected or confirmed to have disorders or disabilities that negatively impact their ability to learn or maintain appropriate classroom and/or social behavior. This course also covers developmental assessment as it relates to making appropriate educational plans. This is a required course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities (early childhood, childhood, middle childhood and adolescent levels). Professional seminars and field experiences accompany this course.
 
ED 672 DIFFERENTIATING CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION (3 credits)
The selection and differentiation of curriculum and instruction is examined from the perspective of students whose individual learning needs cannot be met through the curriculum or instructional model used for general classroom instruction. This course is designed to provide Early Childhood, Childhood, Middle Childhood and Adolescent teachers with the skills needed to include students whose individual needs vary along a continuum from giftedness to moderate and severe disabilities (includes students with 504 accommodation needs, students with high-incidence disorders and disabilities, and those from diverse background such as English language learners and those for whom attaining basic literacy is a struggle) in the regular classroom. This course is a required course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities, Literacy, and for students seeking the gifted extension.

ED 672A DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION IN INCLUSIVE SECONDARY SETTINGS (3 credits)
This is an advanced course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities at the Adolescence level or for graduate students wishing to expand their breadth and depth of knowledge in adapting instruction for students across the continuum of special needs.  This course is designed to assist the professional educator in the task of planning and implementing classroom, instructional, and support services for students with complex needs. Appropriate selection of assistive and regular technology is addressed.  Fieldwork is required.
Prerequisites:ED 640 and 641-647 or equivalent
 
ED 673 ADVANCED DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION: THE THERAPEUTIC CLASSROOM (3 credits)
An advanced course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities at the Early Childhood, Childhood, Middle Adolescence or Adolescence levels, certification in differentiated instruction, or for the graduate student wishing to expand their breadth and depth of knowledge in differentiating instruction for students across the continuum of special needs (including those identified as gifted and/or talented and those struggling to attain basic literacy). The course is designed to assist the professional educator in the complex task of planning and implementing classroom, instructional, and support services for students with complex needs. Appropriate selection and implementation of assistive and regular technology is emphasized. Students will also learn how to participate in collaborative family, school, and community partnerships as well as advocate for families and students with disorders, disabilities, and therapeutic needs.

ED 674 CLASSROOM COMMUNITY AND SOCIALIZATION (3 credits)
This course will provide students with the theoretical and practical bases for developing classroom communities that are grounded in the concepts of caring, mutual respect, trust, safety, and valuing each member of the community. Such classrooms require teachers to model these attributes and behaviors and to teach them directly to their students, as systematically as they would teach literacy, mathematics, and science. Students will study the research and writings of educators who espouse cooperation in place of competition and who eschew “classroom management” in favor of “caring communities.” They will have opportunities to develop key aspects of caring classrooms, and they will observe the classrooms of teachers who practice these principles in their daily teaching.

ED 675 STUDENTS WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES (3 credits)
This course provides students with an understanding of individuals who have been diagnosed with severe or multiple disabilities. The course will take a life-span perspective by focusing on preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults, and will include discussion of individuals who have retardation, autism, those who demonstrate significant behavioral challenges, and/or those who have special health-care needs. Students will study the psychological, social, and physical characteristics of individuals with severe disabilities, laws pertaining to educating students with severe disabilities, and theoretical and philosophical foundations underlying current practice. Students will study, observe, and implement research-based strategies for teaching students with severe disabilities in inclusive school and community settings. Students will understand and conduct ecological assessments of students and environments and explore the use of assistive technology to enhance autonomy and learning. Knowledge will be acquired through coursework, discussions, and required fieldwork.

ED 676 ACTION RESEARCH (3 credits)
In this course, which is a required co-requisite of student teaching, students will develop the skills of reflection and inquiry within the context of their own teaching. Students will practice using different tools for reflective inquiry as they explore issues relevant to novice teachers (i.e., creating and maintaining caring, inclusive, and productive learning environments. Students will design and implement a research project in their classroom to focus on an issue of relevance to them in their present teaching situation. The course will integrate theory and practice so that students may develop the skills and dispositions needed for conducting action research throughout their professional careers.

ED 677 TEACHING LITERACY SKILLS TO CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS (3 credits)
This course examines literacy development for children with diverse learning needs related to cognitive, behavioral, linguistic, cultural and gender factors. Issues explored include the identification/special assessment/intervention process, the impact of mandated state literacy assessments on compensatory literacy programs, and the role of the literacy specialist in supporting students both through inclusion and pull-out programs. There will be a focus on remedial reading/writing strategies to support students experiencing difficulty in decoding/encoding, vocabulary development, and reading comprehension.
 
ED 679 PRACTICUM IN SPECIAL EDUCATION   (3 credits)
The Special Education practicum is a full-time, 12-week experience differentiated as follows:
  • Students seeking the Childhood Certificate in Teaching Students with Disabilities will spend six weeks in a grade 1-3 inclusion classroom and six weeks in a grade 4-6 inclusion classroom, with visits to self–contained special education settings.
  • Students seeking both the Childhood and Early Childhood Certificates in Teaching Students with Disabilities and/or the Middle Level Teaching Students with Disabilities certificate will spend four weeks each in inclusion classrooms in grades K-1, grades 2-5, and grades 6-9 with visits to self-contained special education settings.
  • Students currently teaching in an elementary classroom where they have responsibility for special education children included in their classroom will use their own classroom for student teaching and will spend 20 hours in a classroom at a different age level.
A Pace University full-time or clinical faculty member will supervise all students.

ED 680 WORKING WITH FAMILIES (3 credits)
In this course, students will study families from an historical, cultural and theoretical perspective. Students will investigate home/school policies. They will learn about parent involvement and parent education, and develop a range of effective strategies and methods for communicating with families. This course is required for students in the Early Childhood and Teaching Students with Disabilities at the Early Childhood Level programs.

ED 681 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION IN EDUCATION (3 credits)
In this course students will learn about a variety of formal and informal assessment instruments and develop the skills to select, evaluate and interpret these instruments. There will be opportunities to use a variety of assessments for monitoring child growth and development and sharing those results with families and team members. Students will apply the data from assessments to identify learner strengths and individualize instruction to facilitate academic success.

ED 682 COLLABORATION AND CONSULTATION (3 credits)
Students will learn about the importance of collaboration between teachers in the regular classroom and teachers of students with disabilities. Students will learn how to work as a member of a professional multidisciplinary team in assessing, evaluating, planning, creating and utilizing both an IFSSP and an IEP (as well as a 504 accommodation plan). Students will learn how to communicate with and advocate for families and young children with developmental and acquired disorders and disabilities. Fieldwork/apprenticeship is required with this course. This is a required course for those in the Early Childhood and Teaching Students with Disabilities in Early Childhood, Childhood, Middle Childhood, and Adolescence programs.
ED 684 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT & COLLABORATION IN INCLUSIVE SECONDARY SETTINGS  (3 credits)
This course is grounded in theory and research on classroom management, positive behavior supports, collaborative decision-making, consultation, and co-teaching. Fieldwork is required. 

ED 685: METHODS FOR TEACHING ADOLESCENT STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES (3 credits)
This is an advanced course for those seeking certification in Teaching Students with Disabilities at the Adolescence level or for graduate students wishing to expand their breadth and depth of knowledge in adapting instruction for students across the continuum of special needs.  This course is designed to assist the professional educator in the task of planning and implementing classroom, instructional, and support services for students with complex needs.  Appropriate selection of assistive and regular technology is addressed.  Fieldwork is required.
Prerequisites:ED 672a
 
ED 690 TEACHER AS RESEARCHER (3 credits)
In this course, which is a required co-requisite with student teaching, students will develop the skills of reflection and inquiry within the context of their own teaching. Students will practice using different tools for reflective inquiry as they explore issues relevant to novice teachers, i.e., creating and maintaining caring, inclusive, and productive learning environments. Students will design and implement a research project in their classroom that focuses on an issue of relevance to them in their present teaching situation. The course will integrate theory and practice so that students may develop the skills and dispositions needed for conducting action research throughout their professional careers.
Prerequisites: Corequisite to ED 691 and ED 692

ED 691 STUDENT TEACHING IN THE CHILDHOOD CLASSROOM (6 credits)
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with children in the primary (grades 1-3) and intermediate (grades 4-6) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction with actual teaching practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching.
Prerequisites: Corequisite to ED 690

ED 691 A, B TEACHING INTERNSHIP IN THE CHILDHOOD CLASSROOM (3 credits (each))
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students in the primary (grades 1-3) and intermediate (grades 4-6) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this semester-long experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching. These internships comprise the year-long, 6-credit option for the teaching internship.

ED 692 STUDENT TEACHING IN THE ADOLESCENT CLASSROOM (6 credits)
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students in the early adolescent (grades 7-9) and adolescent (grades 10-12) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching.
Prerequisites: Corequisite to ED 690

ED 692 A, B TEACHING INTERNSHIP IN THE ADOLESCENT CLASSROOM (3 credits (each))
Students will develop their teaching skills through working with students in the early adolescent (grades 7-9) and adolescent (grades 10-12) classrooms, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. During this one-semester experience, students will assume increasing responsibility for the classroom environment and design and management of the curriculum, reflecting regularly on all aspects of their teaching. These internships comprise the year-long, 6-credit option for the teaching internship.

ED 692T STUDENT TEACHING (3-6 credits)
For candidates who do not hold a classroom teaching certificate, documentation of 100 hours of field experiences in elementary and secondary schools and two practica, one in elementary and one in a secondary school setting.
Prerequisites: Core coursework completion

ED 693 A, B PRACTICUM IN LITERACY BIRTH TO GRADE 6 (3 credits (each))
This clinical practicum is required as part of the M.S.Ed. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the Birth-Grade 6 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from birth through grade 6 in literacy assessment and instruction. The student may choose from several practica locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client’s home and/or school.
Concurrent enrollment in ED 696 Literacy Capstone Project is required.

ED 694 A, B PRACTICUM IN LITERACY, GRADES 5-12 (3 credits (each))
The clinical practicum that is required as part of the M.S.Ed. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the grades. 5-12 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from grade 6 through grade 12 in literacy assessment and instruction. The student may choose from several practica locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client’s home and/or school.
Concurrent enrollment in ED 696 Literacy Capstone Project is required.

ED 695 PRACTICUM IN LITERACY, BIRTH TO GRADE 12 (6 credits)
This clinical practicum is required as part of the M.S.Ed. in Literacy program for those seeking certification at the Birth through Grade 12 level. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours working with children from birth through 12 in literacy assessment and instruction. The 100 clock hours are equally divided between Birth-Grade 6 and Grade 5-Grade 12. The student may choose from several practica locations. Faculty supervision is provided as the student provides assessment, instruction, and consultation/collaboration with the client’s home and/or school.
Concurrent enrollment in ED 696 Literacy Capstone Project is required.

ED 696 LITERACY CAPSTONE PROJECT (3 credits)
This Capstone Project entails the creation of a case study using a client from the practicum setting. The case study will be developed through assistance from supervising faculty, peer case conferences, and individual clinical experience. The final case study document will contain pre-andpost assessments, an instructional plan, a literacy log that documents weekly instructional activities and strategies, progress measures, client comments, and personal self-reflections. Additionally, the case study will contain a case summary and post-instructional recommendations.
Concurrent enrollment in ED 693, 694, or 695 is required.

ED 698 PRACTICUM IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY (3 credits)
This practicum is particularly designed to engage in educational problem-solving using technology. Students will be given one or more educational problems and asked to analyze and solve the problem. Problems will be authentic and may be proposed by either University or public school teachers or administrators. Examples include, but are not limited to, creation of on-line courses or course supplements, hardware or software problems, Internet-based problems linking public schools to appropriate Internet sites and resources, etc. Students will learn to ask the right questions, research existing solutions, and create ones unique to the problem posed.

ED 758 WRITING PROCESS & MEDIA PRODUCTION (3 credits)
This course deepens understanding of the repertoire of strategies for writing with children and explores models of integrated writing programs. Writing is examined as a recursive, developmental process, and candidates will explore the writing process through their own experiences as well as through as investigation of relevant professional reading and current research. Formats and strategies for media production will be introduced and applied in classroom assignments. This class will build competencies in knowledge of information, application of strategies in classrooms, and coaching/mentoring activities for professionals and community members. Field experience is required.

ED 775 TEACHING STUDENTS WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES (3 credits)
This course provides students with an understanding of individuals who have been diagnosed with severe disabilities. The course will take a life-span perspective by focusing on preschoolers, school-aged children, and adults, and will include discussion of individuals who have cognitive impairment, autism, those who demonstrate significant behavioral challenges, and/or those who have special health care needs. Students will study the psychological, social, and physical characteristics of individuals with severe disabilities, laws pertaining to educating students with severe disabilities, and theoretical and philosophical foundations underlying recent practice. Students will study, observe, and implement research-based strategies for teaching students with severe disabilities in inclusive school and community settings. Students will understand and conduct ecological assessments of students and environments and explore the use of assistive technology to enhance autonomy and learning. Knowledge will be acquired through coursework, discussions, and required fieldwork.

ED 776 INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS (3 credits)
This is an advanced course for those seeking a specialization in teaching students with autism/severe disabilities, at the early childhood, childhood, middle adolescence, or adolescence levels; or for graduate students wishing to expand their breadth and depth of knowledge in differentiating instruction for students across the continuum of special needs. This course is designed to assist the professional educator in the complex task of planning and implementing classroom, instructional, and support services for students with autism spectrum disorders. Selection and use of assistive and regular technology is addressed. Students will also learn how to participate in collaborative family, school, and community partnerships as well as advocate for families and students with significant disabilities. In this advanced course, candidates will have the opportunity to implement action research projects related to specific instructional interventions.

ED 779A, B, C TARA SPECIAL EDUCATION PRACTICUM AND SEMINAR (3 credits)
Candidates will develop their teaching skills through working with students with diverse learning needs in childhood settings, integrating theories of development, learning, collaboration, language and literacy acquisition, curriculum development, using technology, assessment and differentiating instruction in their discipline with actual teaching practice. The practicum and seminar are provided throughout the advanced certificate program.

ED 782 COLLABORATION AND CONSULTATION: TRANSDISCIPLINARY TEAMS TO SUPPORT STUDENTS WITH AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES IN INCLUSIVE SCHOOLS (3 credits)
This course is designed to prepare teachers to collaborate with others in similar and allied professions, support personnel, parents, and students, to design, implement, and evaluate effective instruction to meet the needs of individual students with and without disabilities. The course will encourage students to develop and use the skills and dispositions necessary to work collaboratively in educational settings with general educators. Course content is grounded in theory and research on collaborative decision-making, consultation, and co-teaching. Furthermore, this course is designed in accord with federal initiatives maintaining that the education of students with disabilities is a multidisciplinary endeavor; the goal of which is to provide all students with access to the general education curriculum in general education classes.

ED789 DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (3 credits)
In this course, students will learn to identify the core symptoms of children who are diagnosed on the Autistic Spectrum. Due to the unusual array of symptoms that make up the spectrum diagnosis, video presentations of children on the spectrum will be used to enhance this learning objective. The video presentations also act as a catalyst to spur student interaction and the integration of the didactic material with the clinical presentation. A number of additional factors add to the diagnostic confusion of children on the spectrum: 1) Autism is a dynamic diagnosis, not a static diagnosis. Hence, the symptom severity and quality can change over time as the child develops. 2) Autism has a very high comorbidity rate with a number of additional psychiatric disorders including: ADHD, OCD, Tourette’s Disorder, Anxiety Disorders, and Mood Disorders. This is the biggest source of diagnostic confusion in that there is a lot of overlap of symptoms between these various disorders. 3) The internal regulation difficulties (impulse, affect, and mood) and the executive function deficits of children on the spectrum add further confusion and challenge to their presentation in the classroom. These additional issues are dealt with in this course by focusing on the developmental perspective and by our careful review of these additional developmental and diagnostic areas as they interface with children on the spectrum. Video presentations of these additional areas of concern are used to help the student integrate the didactic with the clinical presentation. Current treatment interventions for Autism and these related disorders will also be reviewed in detail.