Educational Leadership Courses - PAGE 1

EDL 601 ADMINISTERING CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS (3 credits)An overview of existing models of children’s programs and the specific roles and responsibilities involved in the administration of these programs. Includes practical experience with program planning and implementation.

Module A:Organizational Management: Principles and Practices, presents an overview of the principles and practices involved in planning and establishing quality early childhood programs, and a survey of existing models of children’s programs. Module B: Personnel Management, presents an overview of personnel policies/procedures, and legal issues in personnel administration in early care and education programs for children and families. Module C: Human Relations, presents an overview of the ways in which leadership styles and organizational structure affect human relationships, program quality and decision making in early care and education programs.
 
EDL 602 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT IN CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS (3 credits)
Systems theory and practical applications related to operations management and policy development in  quality programs for children and families: enrollment and retention of children and families, record keeping, technology and communication systems, health and safety policies and procedures, and space allocation and maintenance. Module A: Management Systems for Quality Programs provides an examination of management systems theory and practice, the development of  systems for management in children’s programs, and a survey of national program accreditation models. Module B: Technology and Communication, presents an overview of the various, types of technology that administrators can use in operations management, in program enhancement, and in communication with families, community and professionals in early childhood and related fields. Module C.: Health and Safety, provides an overview of health and safety legal requirements, health and safety policies and practices, curriculum programming for health and safety,  nutrition in children’s programs, record keeping related to health and safety, child abuse reporting, and maintaining health and safety in building, grounds and equipment.
 
EDL 603 FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS (3 credits)
An analysis of all aspects of financial management in quality programs for children and families. Includes hands-on experience with the financial planning process and with the practical applications involved in the fiscal administration of a children’s program. Module A: Formulating a Financial Plan, is designed to develop knowledge of the principles of sound financial planning and management and the ability to apply those principles to the operation of quality children’s programs. Module B: Budgets and Accounting, presents an overview of the development of program budgets and practical experience in the application of those principles to the financial planning and management of programs for children and families. Module C: Resources and Expenses, includes an examination of the “trilemma” in children’s programs of quality/ staff compensation/ fees; an analysis of the true cost of service; cost saving policies and procedures, including purchasing of equipment, supplies and services; funding sources and fund raising, including grant writing; insurance needs and options; and practical applications of the principles and practices discussed.
 
EDL 604 DESIGNING PROGRAMS THAT ARE GOOD FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES (3 credits)
An examination of best practices for children and families as defined by professional  guidelines and the latest research. Includes a historical perspective of program development; a knowledge base related to child growth and development; working with children with special needs; effective communication among children, families and staff, and collaboration with community resources to support children and families. Module A: Programming for the Whole Child, includes an overview of child growth and development stages and their implications for program development, environmental designs for various ages, appropriate curriculum models for various groups, concepts of care that recognize the individual and group needs of children and evaluation processes to measure program quality. Module B: Programming for the Whole Family, includes a review of the research and professional principles and practices which support family involvement in all aspects of early care and education programs, including communication,  decisionmaking, cultural contexts, and community resources. Module C: Programming for Children with Special Needs, presents policies and practices for the identification of children with special needs, the collaboration with families and multi-disciplinary community resources to meet those needs, and working with program staff to support children, families and staff in the implementation of individual plans for education and care.
 
EDL 605 INTEGRATIVE PRACTICUM IN CHILDREN’S PROGRAM  ADMINISTRATOR  (3 credits)
This course is considered the first half of the administrative internship. Upon completion of EDL 605, students should take EDL 697. Initially a grade of K is granted in EDL 605; that K grade is changed to a standard letter grade (i.e., A, B, or C) upon completing EDL 697.
Prerequisites: EDL 601, 602, 603, 604, 614
 
EDL 609 HIGHER EDUCATION ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION  (3 credits)
Provides the student with an overview of higher education administration. It will include discussions of the distinction among various types of post-secondary institutions, as well as discussions of major organizational models, important legislation affecting higher education institutions and current issues in higher education. This is an elective course for nursing and education administration students.
 
EDL 614 THE COMMUNITY AND SCHOOL LEADERSHIP (3 credits)
This course focuses on techniques for consensus building and participatory approaches to school-community and district-community decisions. The course emphasizes the importance of understanding the meaning of community within the classroom and school; and the importance of community as a matter of dialogue and partnership with families and other community members and external agencies. Attention to family/home addressed portfolio needs of candidates interested in Early Childhood Administration.
 
EDL 619 GROUP DYNAMICS: THE TEACHER, THE STUDENT AND THE SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR (3 credits)
Studies interpersonal relations problems in dealing with administrators, teachers and students in metropolitan and suburban environments. In addition, teachers’ roles and the students’ roles in a changing society and school life, organization and “life styles” involved in group decisions will be discussed. Techniques such as mediation, fact-finding, arbitration and negotiation processes as group dynamics are investigated.
 
EDL 620 CRITICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP (3 credits)
Examines the major issues facing educational leaders today. Areas of review will vary over time and may include topics such as: productivity and accountability, economic and demographic trends, governance, the changing family structure, the financial base for supporting education, standards and testing.
 
EDL 624 MENTORING (3 credits)
A seminar directed at both practicing and prospective administrators interested in developing mentoring programs or serving as mentors in schools. The  seminar will examine the roles and responsibilities of mentors, strategies for implementing mentoring programs and processes for selecting mentors. Participants will also develop case studies that will serve as the basis for analysis of different programs and models.
 
EDL 628 ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES (3 credits)
Emphasizes the organization and delivery of all those support services commonly referred to as “pupil personnel services” from school-based and district-wide perspectives. The course will deal with law, policies, budgets, procedures and forms necessary for the operation of these support services. Roles, supervisory aspects and procedures regarding: guidance; discipline; secondary, college and career counseling; attendance; student health matters; family issues;  social services. In addition, attention will be paid to the impact of “No child left behind” legislation and the increased use of inclusive (integrated) models of instruction.
 
EDL 636 SUPERVISION AND THE IMPROVEMENT OF TEACHING AND LEARNING (3 credits)
This course focuses on the role of the supervisor or teacher-mentor in bringing about desirable changes in teaching and learning. Study consists of the distinction between supervision and staff development. Use is made of significant research and best practice to explore the areas of promoting human potential, communication, the measurement of classroom behavior, the utilization of a variety of techniques to promote teacher self-analysis and assisting teachers to deal with innovative approaches in curriculum and instruction, including the use of modern technology. The tension between development and evaluation is highlighted in this course.
 
EDL 637 CURRICULUM WORKSHOP FOR SCHOOL LEADERS (3 credits)
This course emphasizes curriculum development. It includes a study of the history of curriculum development and of current issues and trends in curricular matters. Students are expected to create, evaluate and modify curricula for a chosen level and/or discipline.
 
EDL 639 SUPERVISION AND CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY  CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS (3 credits)
Provides students interested in Early Childhood education with an overview of the various aspects of administering such programs including the competencies.
 
EDL 642 ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERS (3 credits)
Introduces school administrators to the basic principles of data processing and management information systems. Topics include: basic concepts and terminology in data processing, logic and equipment; tools of analysis for determining school needs; the application of information systems to instructional and administrative decision making; and the implications of computer-automated systems. Course may be taken on a non-credit basis with the approval of department chair.